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Daily Harvest (Plant Based Delivery)

Posted on June 18, 2020 at 12:05 PM

GET STARTED WITH $25 OFF!

I really enjoy their MINT smoothie, the blueberry cacao smoothie, and the strawberry scoop.


Magnesium Glycinate: Supplement Guide

Posted on November 3, 2019 at 3:50 PM


Magnesium Glycinate: Supplement Guide

Originally published on HVMN by Jamie Witherby.


You know those nights. The ones you wake up in the middle of, clutching your knees to rock yourself back asleep. It’s not a nightmare that roused you. It’s something much, much worse: leg cramps.

The pain is sudden, searing, and seemingly out of your control. But those calf contractions could be trying to tell you something. Muscle cramps are frequently a sign of magnesium deficiency in healthy adults.1,2,3


Table of Contents

Meet Magnesium

Magnesium Deficiency is Everywhere

Hypomagnamesia Symptoms

Magnesium Sufficiency for Overall Health

Restored Rest for the Magnesium Deficient

Reduced Inflammatory Stress

Putting the Glycinate in Magnesium Glycinate

Raise Your Inhibitions: Glycine in Nervous System Function

Bounce Back with Glycine: Tissue Treatment

Better Sleep with Glycine

Magnesium + Glycinate are the The Perfect Pair

A Powerful Duo

In this article, we’ll discuss what magnesium is, why it’s crucial for optimal health, and how pairing it with glycinate makes it the ideal supplement form.

Meet Magnesium

Scoring an atomic number of twelve, magnesium (Mg) is a silver-white metal from the alkaline family. Its strong-yet-lightweight structure, high melting point (1,202°F), and brilliant white flame make it a hot choice for alloys in the aerospace industry, especially gearboxes for helicopters and other aircrafts.

Magnesium is the ninth most abundant element on the planet and the fourth most abundant cation (positively charged ion) in our bodies.

Over half of our magnesium lives in our bones, another quarter in our muscles, and the rest in our soft tissues and extracellular fluid (fluid outside the cells).4

You also eat this metal every day. Or at least you should. Magnesium is a critical cofactor for over 300 enzyme systems, including synthesizing proteins, regulating blood pressure, and controlling blood sugar levels. You probably didn’t know you were so dependent on this mineral, but you can’t do much without it; it’s required for aerobic and anaerobic energy production. Want to keep your healthy bone structure? Magnesium. Need to synthesize some RNA? Magnesium. Care to maintain nerve and muscle function? Magnesium.5 You get the picture. It’s an understatement to say magnesium has some pretty crucial health benefits.

Unfortunately, it’s not as abundant in our diets as it should be. The Food and Drug Administration estimates that up to 68% of people in the United States are magnesium deficient.

Knowing which supplement to take is hard

Let us help with our science-backed guides built by experts. Subscribe to learn more.

Magnesium Deficiency is Everywhere

Before we dive into the problems of magnesium deficiency, let’s review some foods that are great forms of magnesium. Spinach, Swiss chard, and other dark greens are a saturated source of your daily magnesium. Go nutty with almonds, Brazil nuts, and cashews, too. Fiber-rich choices include beans, legumes, and filling whole grains. And the food that really puts the “yum” in magnesium? Dark chocolate.

But even if you’re eating all your leafy greens and fibrous beans to get the essential nutrient, the declining magnesium levels in the soil they were grown in puts you at risk for magnesium deficiency.6

Magnesium levels in soil are declining because of modern farming practices;6 overuse of the soil disallows it from restoring its natural mineral content before being used to grow food again. By the time vegetables are washed and transported, their meager magnesium content is laughable.7

Other produce processing techniques can strip away the food’s magnesium levels, like bleaching whole grains and overcooking greens.8 Even common medications such as antacids, antibiotics, and diuretics can affect the body’s ability to absorb magnesium or increase your renal (kidney) excretions of the precious mineral.3

The good news? The metal can be found in regular old drinking water—up to a tenth of your daily magnesium intake. The bad news? Purification practices are a little too efficient, so most of the magnesium content never even crosses your lips. But stick with water for a better chance of getting your recommended intake as coffee and alcohol increase your body’s demand for it.3


Hypomagnamesia Symptoms

If you’re worried that you could have low magnesium levels, here are some medical conditions and symptoms of magnesium deficiency:4

Fatigue

Sleep disturbances

Depression

Muscle cramps

Muscle weakness

High blood pressure

High blood sugar

Asthma

Impaired exercise performance

Irregular heartbeat

Take another look at the list—how many of these have you experienced just in the past month or so?

The problem with identifying hypomagnamesia (magnesium deficiency) is that it tends to be asymptomatic until levels drop dramatically. And even when the symptoms are present, they can easily be attributed to other factors.

On the flipside, if you’re worried that you may be getting too much magnesium from your diet, fear not; your kidneys can take care of any excess magnesium.

Magnesium Sufficiency for Overall Health

Sufficient magnesium intake has numerous benefits. Grab a handful of spinach and a piece of dark chocolate for good measure, and let’s discuss the positives of supplementing with magnesium.

Restored Rest for the Magnesium Deficient

Let’s return to our list of hypomagnamesia symptoms. One of the big ticket items is sleep disturbances. Supplementing with magnesium has been shown to improve sleep qualityin individuals with low magnesium levels.9,10

A 2002 study found that taking magnesium before bed led to an increase in slow wave sleep, which is the deepest phase of sleep characterized by delta waves and non-rapid eye movement (NREM). If you’ve ever been caught sleepwalking, you can thank slow wave sleep for its zombie-style effects on your muscles.10

Reduced Inflammatory Stress

Unfortunately, those sleep disturbances come at a greater cost than dark circles under eyelids and general crankiness. Inadequate sleep is associated with increases in multiple inflammatory biomarkers.9 These proteins or enzymes are the biomarkers that point to systemic inflammation. One of the most infamous inflammatory biomarkers is the C-reactive protein (CRP), which is an effective predictor of cardiac morbidity. As you lose sleep from a lack of magnesium, these CRPs increase, meaning you’re inflamed.11

Persistent inflammation can lead to serious chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs), such as: rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and systemic lupus erythematosus—an autoimmune disease in which the immune system mistakenly perceives healthy tissues as a threat and begins attacking them.12 Of course, these serious disorders have complicated etiologies based on genetics as well as environment.

You can probably guess an initiative: taking magnesium can reduce the inflammation.

A 2010 study with sleep and magnesium-deprived adults found that supplementing with magnesium improved sleeping patterns and decreased the amount of CRP biomarkers found in their plasma. Their levels of inflammation went down, and which has been associated with a reduced risk for developing CIDs.9



Putting the Glycinate in Magnesium Glycinate

We covered magnesium, but we haven’t even talked about the other half of this powerful combo: glycinate.

Glycinate is the salt form of glycine, a non-essential amino acid that plays an essential role in both the peripheral and central nervous system (CNS). Glycine is considered to be a non-essential amino acid because the body naturally produces it, but research says our metabolic demands are higher than our abilities to produce it.13 Once chronic, glycine deficiency can lead to impairment of nutrient metabolism and impairment of nervous system function.14

Raise Your Inhibitions: Glycine in Nervous System Function

Along with gamma-Aminobutyric acid, glycine is one of the main inhibitory transmitters of the CNS. Glycine activates brain and spinal cord receptors to allow chloride into the CNS, which will inhibit the cells. Inhibition is imperative because it allows precise thoughts, movements, and attention to alter or stop a neurological response, all of which are required for normal motor and behavioral functioning.15 Glycine may also play a role in the synchronization of our circadian rhythms to influence our internal clocks.16

Bounce Back with Glycine: Tissue Treatment

Glycine is a precursor to the production of the ingredient in skin-tightening products: collagen. Collagen is the connective tissue component providing structure for your skin, cartilage, and tendons. Because glycine is so tiny (the smallest amino acid), it’s able to fit between the tight intersections of larger amino acids forming the collagen proteins. This flexibility is part of what gives your skin that youthful bounce.17

Better Sleep with Glycine

A 2006 study observed that glycine can also greatly improve sleep quality.16

But this amino acid doesn’t promise to put you to sleep as soon as your head hits the pillow or induce the deepest REM cycles. Instead, glycine has a greater effect on how you’ll feel once you get up.18 Glycine ingestion can alleviate fatigue, increase liveliness, and generate a clear-headed feeling upon waking.19

One of the possible mechanisms for ushering you into dreamland is glycine’s thermoregulatory effects.

Glycine can lower your body’s core temperature, which is one of your body’s natural mechanisms in preparation of sleep.20

Bonus round: glycine is considered safer than traditional sleeping drugs. Even relatively high doses yield no serious side effects.19


Magnesium + Glycinate are the The Perfect Pair

Magnesium glycinate is an organic magnesium salt created by combining magnesium with the amino acid, glycine.

Combine one sleep-improving mineral salt with a sleep-improving amino acid and you get—a sleep improving supplement. But it’s the details that matter. Taking magnesium in the glycinate, or salt, form is correlated with better absorption of magnesium than other common supplement forms, such as magnesium oxide.21

When you’re looking for a magnesium supplement and want to experience all the benefits of magnesium in the most efficient way, you could look for two different supplements, remember to take both before bed, inevitably forget and miss out on the benefits of supplementing with magnesium and glycinate together. Or simply take Yawn.

Yawn is a non-habit forming sleep aid featuring magnesium glycinate, L-theanine, L-glycine, and melatonin for increased sleep quality and a calming effect.

Remember that the glycinate will also help you enjoy more clarity and less fatigue when it’s time to get up, allowing you to start the day refreshed and ready to go. And because Yawn uses the most bioavailable form of magnesium, your body will be able to absorb it more easily and enjoy more of its effects.22

Magnesium glycinate supplements are usually taken in doses from 100mg - 400mg with no severe side effects reported. A high amount of magnesium is recommended for pregnant women.23 Some minor side effects include gastrointestinal issues such as bloating and diarrhea. As always, discuss your desire to begin magnesium supplementation with your healthcare professional for appropriate medical advice.

A Powerful Duo

Magnesium is an essential mineral the body uses for a majority of its basic functions, including producing the energy it takes to read this article.

Modern food processing makes it very difficult to consume the necessary daily amount, causing roughly two-thirds of the American population to be magnesium deficient, so you may need to keep an eye on your magnesium intake. Low levels of magnesium can contribute to health problems such as chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs).

The mineral and amino acid combination of magnesium glycinate can reduce the chronic disease-causing inflammation and health conditions and provide a better overall sleepexperience without the adverse effects of other sleeping aids. While supplements can compensate for lack of training, using one to optimize recovery can help with better performance.

Supplement with more than magnesium glycinate

Looking for more info on other supplements? Subscribe, and we'll send you more guides put together by our experts.


Scientific Citations

1.

Nielsen FH, Lukaski HC. Update on the relationship between magnesium and exercise. Magnesium Research. 2006;19(3):180-189.

2.

Bilbey DL, Prabhakaran VM. Muscle cramps and magnesium deficiency: case reports. Can Fam Physician. 1996;42:1348-51.

3.

Workinger JL, Doyle RP, Bortz J. Challenges in the Diagnosis of Magnesium Status. Nutrients. 2018;10(9)

4.

Al-ghamdi SM, Cameron EC, Sutton RA. Magnesium deficiency: pathophysiologic and clinical overview. Am J Kidney Dis. 1994;24(5):737-52.

5.

Institute of Medicine (US) Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes. Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D, and Fluoride. Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 1997.

6.

Fardet, A. Food and Nutrition Sciences—Open Special Issues: Public Health Nutrition Initiative. Food and Nutrition Sciences. 2013; 4 (1) 1.

7.

Schulze-Rettmer R. The Simultaneous Chemical Precipitation of Ammonium and Phosphate in the form of Magnesium-Ammonium-Phosphate. Water Sci Technol (1991) 23 (4-6): 659-667

8.

Suri DJ , Tanumihardjo SA. Effects of Different Processing Methods on the Micronutrient and Phytochemical Contents of Maize: From A to Z. Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety. 2016; 15 (5).

9.

Nielsen, F. H., Johnson, L. K., & Zeng, H. (2010). Magnesium supplementation improves indicators of low magnesium status and inflammatory stress in adults older than 51 years with poor quality sleep. Magnesium Research, 23(4), 158-168.

10.

Held K, Antonijevic IA, Künzel H, et al. Oral Mg(2+) supplementation reverses age-related neuroendocrine and sleep EEG changes in humans. Pharmacopsychiatry. 2002;35(4):135-43.

11.

Zakynthinos E, Pappa N. Inflammatory biomarkers in coronary artery disease. J Cardiol. 2009;53(3):317-33.

12.

Straub RH, Schradin C. Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases: An evolutionary trade-off between acutely beneficial but chronically harmful programs. Evol Med Public Health. 2016;2016(1):37-51.

13.

Meléndez-hevia E, De paz-lugo P, Cornish-bowden A, Cárdenas ML. A weak link in metabolism: the metabolic capacity for glycine biosynthesis does not satisfy the need for collagen synthesis. J Biosci. 2009;34(6):853-72.

14.

Matilla, B, Mauriz, JL, Culebras J, González-Gallego J, González P. Glycine: a cell-protecting anti-oxidant nutrient. Nutrición hospitalaria : organo oficial de la Sociedad Española de Nutrición Parenteral y Enteral. 2002; 17. 2-9.

15.

O'Brien JA, Berger AJ. Cotransmission of GABA and glycine to brain stem motoneurons. J Neurophysiol. 1999 Sep;82(3):1638-41

16.

Kawai N, Sakai N, Okuro M, et al. The sleep-promoting and hypothermic effects of glycine are mediated by NMDA receptors in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2015; 40 (6):1405-16

17.

Razak MA, Begum PS, Viswanath B, Rajagopal S. Multifarious Beneficial Effect of Nonessential Amino Acid, Glycine: A Review. Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity; 2017, (1716701), 8

18.

Yamadera W, Inagawa K, Chiba S, et al. Glycine ingestion improves subjective sleep quality in human volunteers, correlating with polysomnographic changes. Sleep and Biological Rhythms. 2007; 5 (2), 126-131

19.

Inagawa K, Hiraoka T, Kohda T, Yamadera W, Takahashi M. Subjective effects of glycine ingestion before bedtime on sleep quality. Sleep and Biological Rhythms. 2006; 4 (1), 75-77

20.

Bannai M, Kawai N. New therapeutic strategy for amino acid medicine: glycine improves the quality of sleep. J Pharmacol Sci. 2012;118(2):145-8.

21.

Schuette SA, Lashner BA, Janghorbani M. Bioavailability of magnesium diglycinate vs magnesium oxide in patients with ileal resection. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 1994; 18(5):430-5.

22.

Deng, X., Song, Y., Manson, J. E., Signorello, L. B., Zhang, S. M., Shrubsole, M. J., . . . Dai, Q. (2013). Magnesium, vitamin D status and mortality: results from US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001 to 2006 and NHANES III. BMC Med, 11(1), 187. doi:10.1186/1741-7015-11-187

23.

Makrides M, Crosby DD, Bain E, Crowther CA. Magnesium supplementation in pregnancy. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014;(4):CD000937.


How to Heal Your Gut

Posted on May 2, 2019 at 12:20 AM










Paleo Hacks. Heal Your Gut. How to Heal Your Gut. Diet. Lifestyle. Health. Eliminate Sugar. Paleo. Kefir, Kombucha, Probiotics, Bone Broth. Hydrate. Coconut Oil. Meditate, De-stress, relax. Yoga. Pilates. Personal Trainer Newport Beach. OC personal Trainer. Pegan. Plant based. Low carb. Eat Fats.

How to Lose Weight Fast: 3 Simple Steps, Based on Science

Posted on April 8, 2019 at 4:05 PM

How to Lose Weight Fast: 3 Simple Steps, Based on Science
EVIDENCE BASED NUTRITION
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/how-to-lose-weight-as-fast-as-possible

STEP 1: Cut Back on Sugar and Starches

STEP 2: Eat Protein, Fat, and Vegetables

STEP 3: Lift Weights 3x Per Week 


SUMMARY:
There are many ways to lose a lot of weight fast.
However, most of them will make you hungry and unsatisfied.
If you don't have iron willpower, then hunger will cause you to give up on these plans quickly.
The plan outlined here will:
Reduce your appetite significantly.
Make you lose weight quickly, without hunger.
Improve your metabolic health at the same time.

Written by Kris Gunnars, BSc on March 14, 2018


Intermittent Fasting (I.F.)

Posted on October 29, 2017 at 11:35 AM

Intermittent Fasting (I.F.)


I love peaceful, quiet mornings; practicing yoga, sipping coffee, listening to music, and long walks out in nature! 

I usually end up doing the 16:8 method of intermittent fasting;

Break the Fast around 1PM ish =)
1:00 PM - 9:00 PM Eating Window
9:00 PM - 1:00 PM Fasting Window

I don't count calories!!! I eat only when I'm hungry, and I eat until I'm satisfied.
I always listen to my body! 

Wake Up
HYDRATE (water) + coffee + movement


Collagen Coffee
I add collagen powder (great for glowing skin, digestion, hair and nails!) and I add some oat milk or nutpods *no sugar* plant based creamer to my coffee.

BCAA (Branched Chain Amino Acids)
BCAA's are so important especially if you are lifting weights! I add BCAA powder to my water and drink in the morning after my coffee. BCAA's help build lean muscle tissue, burn fat, recover from workouts (less soreness), curbs appetite, and this one has ashwaganda which reduces stress =)


1PM or 2PM
this is usually when I eat my first meal. but if I'm hungrier earlier, I will eat. I always listen to my body!

I love combining Fasting with Paleo and Plant Based;
(I make sure to get in plenty of greens and berries!). When it is cold out, I love hot soups. When it's hoto out, I love smoothies!


Breaking my fast always varies... I might start with a couple of medjool dates, eggs or fruit... then my meals look like these below:

Wild Caught Salmon pan fried with lemon, olive oil, and pink himalayan sea salt, with my favorite salad (red onion, cucumber, strawberries, white vinegar, pink sea salt, black pepper).


keep it simple!! Hard-boiled eggs (1 whole and 2 whites) with Himalayan Sea Salt and black pepper. Some sort of fruit (grapes or strawberries usually), Avocado (Healthy fats!), cherry tomatoes, cucumber with vinegar and sea salt.



filet mignon with salad


I always keep fresh produce chopped and ready to snack on


Wasa Whole Grain Rye crackers: only 20 calories per cracker! 


3 Wasa crackers, one has halva (a middle eastern sweet made of ground sesame seeds and honey) with strawberries on top, one has tuna salad with pickled red onions, and one has smashed avocado with everything but the bagel seasoning. yum!




Dinner:
similar to first meal
focus is on protein, veggies, and healthy fats

Snacks/Beverages:
herbal tea (I love peppermint and chamomile)
dates
coffee or decaf if it's later in the day
cucumbers
strawberries
water
green juice - mostly veg, lots of lemon and ginger
julian bakery pro cookie (low carb!)
85-95% dark chocolate, no sugar, paleo and vegan (quality dark chocolate is very healthy for the body and mind!)
tosi nut bar
popcorn




Do I have tennis elbow?

Posted on January 6, 2017 at 11:40 PM

Hi there,

My name is John and I work as a physical therapist in Auckland, New Zealand I recently created www.tennis-elbow-cure.com to help you overcome this painful condition. I was so impressed with this blog that I had to share an infographic that I had made which will help you identify if you have this condition.

I hope it helps!



Cherry Lime Gummies (Collagen Protein)

Posted on November 21, 2015 at 12:00 AM

Cherry Lime Gummies

{Made With Collagen Protein}




ingredients

unsweetened cherry juice - 1-1/2 cups

lime juice - 2 tablespoons

lukewarm water - ⅓ cup

unflavored gelatin - ⅓ cup

liquid stevia 1/2 teaspoon
(optional - this will make your gummies sweeter without adding sugar)

instructions

Combine the juices and bring to a boil over high heat.

dissolve the gelatin in the water (continuously stirring).

Remove the juice from the heat as soon as it reaches a boil. Whisk in the gelatin.

Pour into a glass loaf pan or molds, and chill until set or freeze for 30 minutes or so.

ENJOY!












Credit:

recipe by http://cookituppaleo.com/

Flourless Chocolate Chip Chickpea Blondies with Sea Salt {vegan, gluten-free & healthy}

Posted on September 5, 2015 at 4:05 PM

Flourless Chocolate Chip Chickpea Blondies with Sea Salt

{vegan, gluten-free & healthy}

 

this is a re-post of the blog / recipe by AmbitousKitchen.com





Benefits of Bodyweight Training (with images!)

Posted on August 20, 2014 at 2:25 AM


Source: Fix.com

Grain Free Ginger Cookies (GF, Vegan)

Posted on April 11, 2014 at 2:35 AM

GRAIN FREE GINGER COOKIES

GLUTEN FREE - VEGAN -  GRAIN FREE 



Made with protein-rich almond flour and blackstrap molasses, these cookies are surprisingly loaded with iron, calcium, copper, magnesium, and potassium. Naturally sweetened with pure maple syrup, they are also free of the most common allergens --> eggs, dairy, peanuts and gluten.

Blackstrap molasses is a sweetener that is low on the glycemic index, making it safe for diabetics.  It's high mineral content is thought to help improve menstural cramping.  Read more about the benefits of blackstrap molasses here.


Ginger Molasses Cookies

makes 12 cookies

Inspired by this recipe

 

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups almond flour

2 Tablespoons coconut oil, softened

1/4 cup pure maple syrup

2 Tablespoons blackstrap molasses 

2 teaspoons ground ginger

1/8 teaspoon fine sea salt

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

 

Directions:


  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a medium bowl, and mix until a thick batter is formed.
  2. Chill the batter for 30 minutes in the fridge, to make sure it’s nice and firm before scooping.
  3. Preheat the oven to 350F and drop the batter by rounded tablespoons onto a baking sheet lined with a Silpat, or parchment paper.
  4. Use a wet fork to flatten each dough mound, into your desired cookie thickness. If you’d like a sugar topping, try sprinkling a bit of low-glycemic coconut crystals over the tops before baking.

  

Bake for 8-10 minutes, until firm around the edges, but still soft in the center.

Allow to cool on the pan for 10 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely. 

Serve with a cold glass of homemade almond milk, and enjoy!

 



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