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Magnesium Glycinate: Supplement Guide

Posted on November 3, 2019 at 3:50 PM


Magnesium Glycinate: Supplement Guide

Originally published on HVMN by Jamie Witherby.


You know those nights. The ones you wake up in the middle of, clutching your knees to rock yourself back asleep. It’s not a nightmare that roused you. It’s something much, much worse: leg cramps.

The pain is sudden, searing, and seemingly out of your control. But those calf contractions could be trying to tell you something. Muscle cramps are frequently a sign of magnesium deficiency in healthy adults.1,2,3


Table of Contents

Meet Magnesium

Magnesium Deficiency is Everywhere

Hypomagnamesia Symptoms

Magnesium Sufficiency for Overall Health

Restored Rest for the Magnesium Deficient

Reduced Inflammatory Stress

Putting the Glycinate in Magnesium Glycinate

Raise Your Inhibitions: Glycine in Nervous System Function

Bounce Back with Glycine: Tissue Treatment

Better Sleep with Glycine

Magnesium + Glycinate are the The Perfect Pair

A Powerful Duo

In this article, we’ll discuss what magnesium is, why it’s crucial for optimal health, and how pairing it with glycinate makes it the ideal supplement form.

Meet Magnesium

Scoring an atomic number of twelve, magnesium (Mg) is a silver-white metal from the alkaline family. Its strong-yet-lightweight structure, high melting point (1,202°F), and brilliant white flame make it a hot choice for alloys in the aerospace industry, especially gearboxes for helicopters and other aircrafts.

Magnesium is the ninth most abundant element on the planet and the fourth most abundant cation (positively charged ion) in our bodies.

Over half of our magnesium lives in our bones, another quarter in our muscles, and the rest in our soft tissues and extracellular fluid (fluid outside the cells).4

You also eat this metal every day. Or at least you should. Magnesium is a critical cofactor for over 300 enzyme systems, including synthesizing proteins, regulating blood pressure, and controlling blood sugar levels. You probably didn’t know you were so dependent on this mineral, but you can’t do much without it; it’s required for aerobic and anaerobic energy production. Want to keep your healthy bone structure? Magnesium. Need to synthesize some RNA? Magnesium. Care to maintain nerve and muscle function? Magnesium.5 You get the picture. It’s an understatement to say magnesium has some pretty crucial health benefits.

Unfortunately, it’s not as abundant in our diets as it should be. The Food and Drug Administration estimates that up to 68% of people in the United States are magnesium deficient.

Knowing which supplement to take is hard

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Magnesium Deficiency is Everywhere

Before we dive into the problems of magnesium deficiency, let’s review some foods that are great forms of magnesium. Spinach, Swiss chard, and other dark greens are a saturated source of your daily magnesium. Go nutty with almonds, Brazil nuts, and cashews, too. Fiber-rich choices include beans, legumes, and filling whole grains. And the food that really puts the “yum” in magnesium? Dark chocolate.

But even if you’re eating all your leafy greens and fibrous beans to get the essential nutrient, the declining magnesium levels in the soil they were grown in puts you at risk for magnesium deficiency.6

Magnesium levels in soil are declining because of modern farming practices;6 overuse of the soil disallows it from restoring its natural mineral content before being used to grow food again. By the time vegetables are washed and transported, their meager magnesium content is laughable.7

Other produce processing techniques can strip away the food’s magnesium levels, like bleaching whole grains and overcooking greens.8 Even common medications such as antacids, antibiotics, and diuretics can affect the body’s ability to absorb magnesium or increase your renal (kidney) excretions of the precious mineral.3

The good news? The metal can be found in regular old drinking water—up to a tenth of your daily magnesium intake. The bad news? Purification practices are a little too efficient, so most of the magnesium content never even crosses your lips. But stick with water for a better chance of getting your recommended intake as coffee and alcohol increase your body’s demand for it.3


Hypomagnamesia Symptoms

If you’re worried that you could have low magnesium levels, here are some medical conditions and symptoms of magnesium deficiency:4

Fatigue

Sleep disturbances

Depression

Muscle cramps

Muscle weakness

High blood pressure

High blood sugar

Asthma

Impaired exercise performance

Irregular heartbeat

Take another look at the list—how many of these have you experienced just in the past month or so?

The problem with identifying hypomagnamesia (magnesium deficiency) is that it tends to be asymptomatic until levels drop dramatically. And even when the symptoms are present, they can easily be attributed to other factors.

On the flipside, if you’re worried that you may be getting too much magnesium from your diet, fear not; your kidneys can take care of any excess magnesium.

Magnesium Sufficiency for Overall Health

Sufficient magnesium intake has numerous benefits. Grab a handful of spinach and a piece of dark chocolate for good measure, and let’s discuss the positives of supplementing with magnesium.

Restored Rest for the Magnesium Deficient

Let’s return to our list of hypomagnamesia symptoms. One of the big ticket items is sleep disturbances. Supplementing with magnesium has been shown to improve sleep qualityin individuals with low magnesium levels.9,10

A 2002 study found that taking magnesium before bed led to an increase in slow wave sleep, which is the deepest phase of sleep characterized by delta waves and non-rapid eye movement (NREM). If you’ve ever been caught sleepwalking, you can thank slow wave sleep for its zombie-style effects on your muscles.10

Reduced Inflammatory Stress

Unfortunately, those sleep disturbances come at a greater cost than dark circles under eyelids and general crankiness. Inadequate sleep is associated with increases in multiple inflammatory biomarkers.9 These proteins or enzymes are the biomarkers that point to systemic inflammation. One of the most infamous inflammatory biomarkers is the C-reactive protein (CRP), which is an effective predictor of cardiac morbidity. As you lose sleep from a lack of magnesium, these CRPs increase, meaning you’re inflamed.11

Persistent inflammation can lead to serious chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs), such as: rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and systemic lupus erythematosus—an autoimmune disease in which the immune system mistakenly perceives healthy tissues as a threat and begins attacking them.12 Of course, these serious disorders have complicated etiologies based on genetics as well as environment.

You can probably guess an initiative: taking magnesium can reduce the inflammation.

A 2010 study with sleep and magnesium-deprived adults found that supplementing with magnesium improved sleeping patterns and decreased the amount of CRP biomarkers found in their plasma. Their levels of inflammation went down, and which has been associated with a reduced risk for developing CIDs.9



Putting the Glycinate in Magnesium Glycinate

We covered magnesium, but we haven’t even talked about the other half of this powerful combo: glycinate.

Glycinate is the salt form of glycine, a non-essential amino acid that plays an essential role in both the peripheral and central nervous system (CNS). Glycine is considered to be a non-essential amino acid because the body naturally produces it, but research says our metabolic demands are higher than our abilities to produce it.13 Once chronic, glycine deficiency can lead to impairment of nutrient metabolism and impairment of nervous system function.14

Raise Your Inhibitions: Glycine in Nervous System Function

Along with gamma-Aminobutyric acid, glycine is one of the main inhibitory transmitters of the CNS. Glycine activates brain and spinal cord receptors to allow chloride into the CNS, which will inhibit the cells. Inhibition is imperative because it allows precise thoughts, movements, and attention to alter or stop a neurological response, all of which are required for normal motor and behavioral functioning.15 Glycine may also play a role in the synchronization of our circadian rhythms to influence our internal clocks.16

Bounce Back with Glycine: Tissue Treatment

Glycine is a precursor to the production of the ingredient in skin-tightening products: collagen. Collagen is the connective tissue component providing structure for your skin, cartilage, and tendons. Because glycine is so tiny (the smallest amino acid), it’s able to fit between the tight intersections of larger amino acids forming the collagen proteins. This flexibility is part of what gives your skin that youthful bounce.17

Better Sleep with Glycine

A 2006 study observed that glycine can also greatly improve sleep quality.16

But this amino acid doesn’t promise to put you to sleep as soon as your head hits the pillow or induce the deepest REM cycles. Instead, glycine has a greater effect on how you’ll feel once you get up.18 Glycine ingestion can alleviate fatigue, increase liveliness, and generate a clear-headed feeling upon waking.19

One of the possible mechanisms for ushering you into dreamland is glycine’s thermoregulatory effects.

Glycine can lower your body’s core temperature, which is one of your body’s natural mechanisms in preparation of sleep.20

Bonus round: glycine is considered safer than traditional sleeping drugs. Even relatively high doses yield no serious side effects.19


Magnesium + Glycinate are the The Perfect Pair

Magnesium glycinate is an organic magnesium salt created by combining magnesium with the amino acid, glycine.

Combine one sleep-improving mineral salt with a sleep-improving amino acid and you get—a sleep improving supplement. But it’s the details that matter. Taking magnesium in the glycinate, or salt, form is correlated with better absorption of magnesium than other common supplement forms, such as magnesium oxide.21

When you’re looking for a magnesium supplement and want to experience all the benefits of magnesium in the most efficient way, you could look for two different supplements, remember to take both before bed, inevitably forget and miss out on the benefits of supplementing with magnesium and glycinate together. Or simply take Yawn.

Yawn is a non-habit forming sleep aid featuring magnesium glycinate, L-theanine, L-glycine, and melatonin for increased sleep quality and a calming effect.

Remember that the glycinate will also help you enjoy more clarity and less fatigue when it’s time to get up, allowing you to start the day refreshed and ready to go. And because Yawn uses the most bioavailable form of magnesium, your body will be able to absorb it more easily and enjoy more of its effects.22

Magnesium glycinate supplements are usually taken in doses from 100mg - 400mg with no severe side effects reported. A high amount of magnesium is recommended for pregnant women.23 Some minor side effects include gastrointestinal issues such as bloating and diarrhea. As always, discuss your desire to begin magnesium supplementation with your healthcare professional for appropriate medical advice.

A Powerful Duo

Magnesium is an essential mineral the body uses for a majority of its basic functions, including producing the energy it takes to read this article.

Modern food processing makes it very difficult to consume the necessary daily amount, causing roughly two-thirds of the American population to be magnesium deficient, so you may need to keep an eye on your magnesium intake. Low levels of magnesium can contribute to health problems such as chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs).

The mineral and amino acid combination of magnesium glycinate can reduce the chronic disease-causing inflammation and health conditions and provide a better overall sleepexperience without the adverse effects of other sleeping aids. While supplements can compensate for lack of training, using one to optimize recovery can help with better performance.

Supplement with more than magnesium glycinate

Looking for more info on other supplements? Subscribe, and we'll send you more guides put together by our experts.


Scientific Citations

1.

Nielsen FH, Lukaski HC. Update on the relationship between magnesium and exercise. Magnesium Research. 2006;19(3):180-189.

2.

Bilbey DL, Prabhakaran VM. Muscle cramps and magnesium deficiency: case reports. Can Fam Physician. 1996;42:1348-51.

3.

Workinger JL, Doyle RP, Bortz J. Challenges in the Diagnosis of Magnesium Status. Nutrients. 2018;10(9)

4.

Al-ghamdi SM, Cameron EC, Sutton RA. Magnesium deficiency: pathophysiologic and clinical overview. Am J Kidney Dis. 1994;24(5):737-52.

5.

Institute of Medicine (US) Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes. Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D, and Fluoride. Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US); 1997.

6.

Fardet, A. Food and Nutrition Sciences—Open Special Issues: Public Health Nutrition Initiative. Food and Nutrition Sciences. 2013; 4 (1) 1.

7.

Schulze-Rettmer R. The Simultaneous Chemical Precipitation of Ammonium and Phosphate in the form of Magnesium-Ammonium-Phosphate. Water Sci Technol (1991) 23 (4-6): 659-667

8.

Suri DJ , Tanumihardjo SA. Effects of Different Processing Methods on the Micronutrient and Phytochemical Contents of Maize: From A to Z. Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety. 2016; 15 (5).

9.

Nielsen, F. H., Johnson, L. K., & Zeng, H. (2010). Magnesium supplementation improves indicators of low magnesium status and inflammatory stress in adults older than 51 years with poor quality sleep. Magnesium Research, 23(4), 158-168.

10.

Held K, Antonijevic IA, Künzel H, et al. Oral Mg(2+) supplementation reverses age-related neuroendocrine and sleep EEG changes in humans. Pharmacopsychiatry. 2002;35(4):135-43.

11.

Zakynthinos E, Pappa N. Inflammatory biomarkers in coronary artery disease. J Cardiol. 2009;53(3):317-33.

12.

Straub RH, Schradin C. Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases: An evolutionary trade-off between acutely beneficial but chronically harmful programs. Evol Med Public Health. 2016;2016(1):37-51.

13.

Meléndez-hevia E, De paz-lugo P, Cornish-bowden A, Cárdenas ML. A weak link in metabolism: the metabolic capacity for glycine biosynthesis does not satisfy the need for collagen synthesis. J Biosci. 2009;34(6):853-72.

14.

Matilla, B, Mauriz, JL, Culebras J, González-Gallego J, González P. Glycine: a cell-protecting anti-oxidant nutrient. Nutrición hospitalaria : organo oficial de la Sociedad Española de Nutrición Parenteral y Enteral. 2002; 17. 2-9.

15.

O'Brien JA, Berger AJ. Cotransmission of GABA and glycine to brain stem motoneurons. J Neurophysiol. 1999 Sep;82(3):1638-41

16.

Kawai N, Sakai N, Okuro M, et al. The sleep-promoting and hypothermic effects of glycine are mediated by NMDA receptors in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2015; 40 (6):1405-16

17.

Razak MA, Begum PS, Viswanath B, Rajagopal S. Multifarious Beneficial Effect of Nonessential Amino Acid, Glycine: A Review. Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity; 2017, (1716701), 8

18.

Yamadera W, Inagawa K, Chiba S, et al. Glycine ingestion improves subjective sleep quality in human volunteers, correlating with polysomnographic changes. Sleep and Biological Rhythms. 2007; 5 (2), 126-131

19.

Inagawa K, Hiraoka T, Kohda T, Yamadera W, Takahashi M. Subjective effects of glycine ingestion before bedtime on sleep quality. Sleep and Biological Rhythms. 2006; 4 (1), 75-77

20.

Bannai M, Kawai N. New therapeutic strategy for amino acid medicine: glycine improves the quality of sleep. J Pharmacol Sci. 2012;118(2):145-8.

21.

Schuette SA, Lashner BA, Janghorbani M. Bioavailability of magnesium diglycinate vs magnesium oxide in patients with ileal resection. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 1994; 18(5):430-5.

22.

Deng, X., Song, Y., Manson, J. E., Signorello, L. B., Zhang, S. M., Shrubsole, M. J., . . . Dai, Q. (2013). Magnesium, vitamin D status and mortality: results from US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001 to 2006 and NHANES III. BMC Med, 11(1), 187. doi:10.1186/1741-7015-11-187

23.

Makrides M, Crosby DD, Bain E, Crowther CA. Magnesium supplementation in pregnancy. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014;(4):CD000937.


How to Heal Your Gut

Posted on May 2, 2019 at 12:20 AM









Paleo Hacks. Heal Your Gut. How to Heal Your Gut. Diet. Lifestyle. Health. Eliminate Sugar. Paleo. Kefir, Kombucha, Probiotics, Bone Broth. Hydrate. Coconut Oil. Meditate, De-stress, relax. Yoga. Pilates. Personal Trainer Newport Beach. OC personal Trainer. Pegan. Plant based. Low carb. Eat Fats.

How to Lose Weight Fast: 3 Simple Steps, Based on Science

Posted on April 8, 2019 at 4:05 PM

How to Lose Weight Fast: 3 Simple Steps, Based on Science
EVIDENCE BASED NUTRITION
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/how-to-lose-weight-as-fast-as-possible


STEP 1: Cut Back on Sugar and Starches

STEP 2: Eat Protein, Fat, and Vegetables

STEP 3: Lift Weights 3x Per Week 


SUMMARY:
There are many ways to lose a lot of weight fast.
However, most of them will make you hungry and unsatisfied.
If you don't have iron willpower, then hunger will cause you to give up on these plans quickly.
The plan outlined here will:
Reduce your appetite significantly.
Make you lose weight quickly, without hunger.
Improve your metabolic health at the same time.

Written by Kris Gunnars, BSc on March 14, 2018


13 Benefits of Weightlifting That No One Tells You About

Posted on October 27, 2018 at 5:55 PM

13 Benefits of Weightlifting

That No One Tells You About

credit to this article


1 Muscle Fights Fat

Want to eat that extra piece of pizza without feeling guilty? Lift weights. In study published in the February 2008 issue of Cell Metabolism, Boston University researchers demonstrated that type II muscle fibers, the kind you build when you lift weights, improve whole-body metabolism. The researchers genetically engineered mice with a type II muscle growth-regulating gene that could be turned on and off. After eight weeks on a high-fat, high-sugar diet, they activated the gene, but did not change the mice's diet. Without any change in activity level, the mice lost total body fat. The researchers concluded that an increase in type II muscle fibers can reduce body fat without changes to diet and might be effective in the fight against obesity.

2 Reduce Depression Symptoms

When it comes to the effects of exercise on depression, aerobic exercise, such as running and swimming, has been much more extensively researched than anaerobic exercise, such as weightlifting. But as one study reports, there's little difference between the two in terms of how well they relieve symptoms of depression. A study published in The Primary Care Companion to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry in 2004, followed 40 women and found similar results in those who ran and those who lifted weights for eight weeks. In addition, there was no difference in the percentage of participants in the two groups who remained non-depressed during follow-up.

3 Fight Osteoporosis

As you age, you naturally lose muscle and bone mass. This is of special concern for women, whose bones are smaller to begin with and can become dangerously weakened by age. Vivian Ledesma, D.C., owner and director of Alliance Healing Arts in Seattle, Washington, explains that weightlifting can help fight this. Just as your muscles adapt to the stress of weightlifting by becoming bigger and stronger, your bones also adapt. "Anytime your bones perceive stress, the response is that more bone will be deposited," says Ledesma.

4 Be Better at Your Sport

Whether you're into basketball or baseball, weight training in the gym will translate into better performance, says fitness expert John Carrico. He gives the example of a soccer player doing heavy squats in the gym: "Obviously, a soccer player doesn't sit in the middle of the field and squat, but if he's able to do a high-rep squat with 200 pounds on his back, and he's in a high-intensity situation where he's pushing his limits, then those muscles will be able to push at a high intensity on the soccer field." Carrico, who co-owns Excellence Health and Fitness in Seattle, Washington, notes that weightlifting also improves dexterity, endurance and hand-eye coordination, all of which will help you be at the top of your game.

5 Move With Ease

Body awareness, or being able to recruit the proper muscles in the right sequence, is key for moving in a way that is both efficient and safe in daily life, says fitness expert John Carrico. "When you get out of your car, there's a pattern in which your muscles are recruited that is correct; you activate your midsection, rotate your trunk, bring your leg out of the car, fire your hamstrings then glutes, then stand up." Doing a squat in the gym, Carrico says, helps you to learn how to perform those movements correctly, "rather than doing what most people do, which is to put the pressure into their toes and the quads with no core stability at all."

6 Lower Your Diabetes Risk

The World Health Organization reports that nearly 350 million people have diabetes worldwide and predicts that by 2030, the disease will be the seventh leading cause of death. You probably know that living a healthy lifestyle -- including managing your weight, eating a healthy diet, getting regular exercise and abstaining from tobacco use -- can help you prevent becoming a statistic, but you may not know that weightlifting, specifically, plays a significant role in reducing your risk. A study funded by the National Institutes of Health and published in The Archives of Internal Medicine found that men who lifted weights for 150 minutes each week -- about five 30-minute sessions -- had a 34-percent lower risk of diabetes. Adding regular cardiovascular exercise slashed the risk by 59 percent.

7 Better Heart Health

Keep your ticker in top form by pumping iron, says a study conducted by researchers at the College of Health Sciences’ Department of Health, Leisure and Exercise Science at Appalachian State University. The study looked at what happens to arteries and blood flow after 45 minutes of moderate-intensity strength training and found that there was up to a 20 percent decrease in blood pressure -- a benefit equal to or surpassing that of taking anti-hypertensive drugs. The blood flow-improving effects of resistance exercise persisted for about 30 minutes after the end of a training session and continued for as long as 24 hours in people who trained regularly -- 30 to 45 minutes a few times a week.

8 Better Blood Sugar Control

Whether you have diabetes or risk factors, weightlifting can help regulate blood glucose, according to a study published on the Nature Medicine website in April 2013. Researchers of the study report that weight training encourages the growth of white muscle, which aids in lowering blood glucose because it uses glucose for energy. Mammals, like poultry, have different colors of muscle ranging from red to white. Red muscle, which uses fat oxidation to generate energy, is more prevalent in endurance athletes, such as marathon runners, while white muscle is abundant in weightlifters and sprinters.

9 Prevents Back Pain

If you work in an office, you know that sitting at your desk all day can wreak havoc on your lower back, leading to stiffness and pain. Weightlifting may help strengthen the muscles of your core -- those that support your spine -- to lessen the discomfort and undo some of the damage caused by sitting all day. But what are the best exercises? Fitness expert John Carrico recommends focusing on hip extensions, essentially the opposite motion of the hip flexion that occurs while sitting. Squatting, step-ups and hip extensions are a few examples. Start with just your body weight and then add resistance to increase the challenge. Carrico also recommends abdominal exercises such as planking.

10 Improved Balance

Aside from your major muscle groups, like your pecs and hamstrings, your body has various smaller muscles called stabilizer muscles. These muscles do exactly what you would think: They help stabilize you. Although you might lift weights to flatter your flexing muscles, each time you work out you're indirectly targeting those little muscles that help keep you upright and take care of everyday tasks such as balancing on one foot to reach a high shelf or stopping yourself from falling on an icy surface. This is especially important for people as they age. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, falls are the leading cause of injury-related death in adults over 65.

11 Ladies, You Won't Get Bulky

Stop fearing the weights -- lifting them is not going to turn you into a muscle-bound freak. Building huge muscles is intentional and takes a great amount of work, says certified strength and conditioning coach Mike LoBue, including lifting heavy weight at a high volume many times a week, following a weight-gain diet with copious amounts of lean protein each day and taking supplements. LoBue assures that lifting weights and eating a healthy diet will result in a fit and lean body, not a big and bulky one.

12 It Will Make You Mentally Stronger

When you feel stronger physically, you usually feel stronger mentally. Fitness expert John Carrico says that weightlifting teaches you the skill of perseverance, the ability to overcome discomfort and challenge yourself. "Weight training teaches you to push yourself when everything tells you to stop, when your muscles start to give out and it burns and it hurts," he says. "When we get into those high-intensity situations, we have a choice, we can either stop everything and try to return to our comfort level, or decide that this level of discomfort is worth the reward. That decision -- that it's worth persisting through that uncomfortable situation --100 percent contributes to successful situations in other parts of our lives."

13 You'll Look (and Feel) Better

Plain and simple, weightlifting is the best way to get a lean, toned, fit body -- for both men and women. You can do all the cardio you want, but without some form of resistance training to challenge the muscles, you won't get those toned muscles in all the right places, the ones that shape your body.












Pilates Core Exercise

Posted on May 7, 2018 at 3:55 PM

Yoga Benefits

Posted on October 29, 2017 at 9:05 PM

YOGA BENEFITS


Physical Benefits
The relaxation techniques incorporated in yoga can lessen chronic pain, such as lower back pain, arthritis, headaches and carpal tunnel syndrome. Yoga can also lower blood pressure and reduce insomnia.
Other physical benefits of yoga include:
Increased flexibility
Increased muscle strength and tone
Improved respiration, energy and vitality
Maintaining a balanced metabolism
Weight reduction
Cardio and circulatory health
Improved athletic performance
Protection from injury
Mental Benefits
Aside from the physical benefits, one of the best benefits of yoga is how it helps a person manage stress, which is known to have devastating effects on the body and mind. Stress can reveal itself in many ways, including back or neck pain, sleeping problems, headaches, drug abuse, and an inability to concentrate.   Yoga can be very effective in developing coping skills and reaching a more positive outlook on life.
Yoga’s incorporation of meditation and breathing can help improve a person’s mental well-being. Regular yoga practice creates mental clarity and calmness; increases body awareness; relieves chronic stress patterns; relaxes the mind; centers attention; and sharpens concentration. Body- and self-awareness are particularly beneficial, because they can help with early detection of physical problems and allow for early preventive action.


How I Stay Lean! (My Healthy Habits!)

Posted on October 29, 2017 at 11:55 AM

How I Stay Lean!


https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/intermittent-fasting-guide" target="_blank">

Intermittent Fasting (I usually fast from 8pm until noon the next day)... this is the 16:8 method.
Mindfulness
Core Power Yoga (I usually go daily)
Avoid Negative Vibes / Negative People
Surround myself around like-minding people
Pure Barre (great small micro-movements or a lean/toned body, and it is low impact so easy on the back and the joints)
Eat mostly plant-based foods (veggies)
Drink water
Drink Green Tea (I like mine with honey)
Take Epsom Salt Baths at night to get Magnesium and recover
Sleep 8-9 hours nightly!
Walk outside
Eat chicken or fish or tofu instead of beef for protein
I love eating protein bars (right now I'm super into Pegan bars by Julian Bakery)
https://julianbakery.com/product/pegan-protein-bar-chocolate-lava-12-bars/" target="_blank">https://julianbakery.com/product/pegan-protein-bar-chocolate-lava-12-bars/


Warrior Diet (Intermittent Fasting) How I stay lean and enjoy many foods!

Posted on October 23, 2017 at 11:30 PM

WARRIOR DIET
my favorite way to stay lean, toned, have tons of energy, AND eat the foods I love!!!! 



BECOME A MODERN DAY WARRIOR: THE DIET THAT BROKE ALL THE RULES


Can you really survive and build muscle on one meal a day? We learn everything there is to know about the Warrior Diet.

muscleandfitness.com article

REPOST
BY ANTHONY J. YEUNG, CSCS


Always eat breakfast, eat every 2 - 3 hours, and avoid hunger: these are three diet rules you never violate—at least, never on purpose that is. For example, we accept that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, that eating frequently boosts our metabolism, and that hunger pangs lead to overeating.
Yet, in the late-1990s, one diet broke all those rules and encouraged you to skip your hearty breakfast, stop spacing your meals, feast at night, and, oh, under-eat all day, too.
Surely, you can’t thrive with this diet—let alone gain muscle—right? Nutritionists have long warned us about skipping meals and starving ourselves. How can you succeed by committing diet heresy? Over time, however, something interesting happened:
The diet grew. What’s more, it pioneered a new genre of diets called “intermittent fasting.”
It’s all thanks to the Warrior Diet. Created by Ori Hofmekler, it introduced fasting and under-eating as method of fitness by itself and demanded the discipline to treat your nutrition like training. “The Warrior Diet focuses on total human fitness,” says Hofmekler, “not partial.”
THE STORY BEHIND THE DIET
We need stress. (The good kind, that is.) “Every living organism has something called a ‘stress-response mechanism,’” Hofmekler explains. “It’s a system that must be exercised; if your stress response is inadequate or inhibited, you’ll be prone to health risks.“
Stressing the body, for example, builds muscle: stimulate your muscle fibers, ligaments, and nervous system and your body will respond and grow. Do that a few thousand times, and you’ll look like a Greek God.
“The fact that you are fitness-oriented and training regularly shows that you are tuned to stress,” Hofmekler explains. “But when I introduced this concept of dietary stress, it was heresy.”
The Warrior Diet introduced nutritional stress, not by restricting total calories, but by cycling periods of fasting or under-eating for over 12 hours—or sometimes 16—a day. “With these short-term fasts, you trigger stress response agents,” says Hofmekler. “These are stress protein, heat shock proteins, certain kinds of enzymes, and anti-inflammatory and immune molecules that practically search and destroy every weak element in your body.”
Eating every two hours or eating six meals a days, however, isn’t stressful on your body. Following a regular schedule and avoiding hunger is the opposite.
“If you exercise,” says Hofmekler, “you can see how physical stress benefits the body. For the Warrior Diet, I concluded that humans are programmed especially to thrive under stress, not the other way.”
HOW TO DO THE WARRIOR DIET:
The Warrior Diet requires 20 hours of underfeeding (which includes your sleep) followed by 4 hours of overfeeding at night.
During the day, food choices shift from light-and-fluid to dense. For example, start the day with water, vegetable juices, coffee, or tea. (Anything watery and thin.) As the day continues, have light snacks like whey protein, berries, yogurts, etc. Finally, at night, have large, dense, and cooked meals that your ancient ancestors would’ve recognized as food.
“Go lower on the food chain,” says Hofmekler, “foods that existed 10,000 years ago like fruits, vegetables, legumes, root vegetables, good dairy from pasture-raised animals, eggs from free-range chicken, and wild caught fish. You just can’t go wrong.”
Finally, avoid certain food combinations. “Only protein and vegetables can mix with everything,” says Hofmekler. Everything else needs to be restricted: avoid combinations like nuts and sugar, nuts and fruits, grain and sugar, grain and fruits, alcohol with sugar, and alcohol with starch. You can, however, combine alcohol with protein. “Wine and pasta, bad; wine and fish, good.”
WHY IT WORKS
1. MATCHES OUR EVOLUTION
For thousands of years, “survival of the fittest” ruled the day: those who withstood extreme temperatures, starvation, and stresses lived and passed their genes; those who didn’t died. Thus, we all descended from ancestors who overcame hostile conditions without hot running water or toilet paper. (Hooray us.)
Our modern age, however, removed that stress. The hunt for food was replaced by a line at the grocery store, going hungry was replaced by vending machines, and staying warm during brutal winters was replaced by hot cocoa.
Because early humans proliferated on diets of underfeeding and overfeeding, it suggests that we are meant to thrive on intermittent fasting.
2. POSSIBLE ANTI-AGING EFFECTS
Here’s where the Warrior Diet outperforms other diets: it could lengthen your life.
“Nutritional stress such as intermittent fasting, under-eating, or calorie restriction can extend the lifespan of all organisms from bacteria to humans,” explains Hofmekler. “Aging and many diseases relate to one mechanism in the body: mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR).”
mTOR is a protein that regulates cell growth, proliferation, and survival; when you’re young, it helps you develop into a healthy, mature adult. Once you’re an adult, however, mTOR plays a critical role in diabetes, cancer, and accelerated aging.
“mTOR can really kill you,” says Hofmekler. “It’s called ‘adverse unneeded growth in a non-growing body.’” In a study from the International Journal of Cancer, blocking mTOR signaling pathways acts as a powerful anticancer agent. But while food activates mTOR, a lack of food inhibits it.
In a study in Nature, researchers concluded, “other than mTORC1 inhibition, dietary restriction is currently the only intervention known to extend lifespan in yeast ageing models and in worms, flies and mice.” Researchers also discovered that inhibiting mTOR is influential in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and cancer.
Finally, alternate-day calorie restriction (eating either 56% or 144% of your daily caloric requirement) prolonged the lifespan of seniors, as well as their resistance to infection.
3. SPIKES INSULIN SENSITIVITY
Insulin is the most important hormone in your body for muscle growth and fat loss. Higher insulin sensitivity boosts your carb tolerance and nutrition partitioning (by favorably distributing nutrients between your fat and muscle cells), increases protein synthesis within your muscle cells, and improves fat loss. Bad insulin sensitivity, however, creates health problems like obesity and Type II diabetes.
“High insulin sensitivity is the number one factor to ensure maximum muscle gain for minimum food,” Hofmekler explains. And because the Warrior Diet cycles periods of under-eating and short-term fasting, you’ll elevate your insulin sensitivity throughout the day.
The Warrior Diet also requires you to exercise during your under-eating phase, which further improves your insulin sensitivity.
4. IMPROVES FAT LOSS AND MUSCLE GROWTH
Because the Warrior Diet (and intermittent fasting) spikes your insulin sensitivity, you’ll burn more fat—even without reducing your calories. Researchers at LSU found, when keeping calories constant, alternate-day fasting improved fat oxidation dropped body fat by 4% in 22 days.
Also, the Warrior Diet rejects the myth that late-night eating will make you fat—instead, feasting at night can help you build more muscle.
Growth hormone (GH), a powerful stimulator of muscle and bone growth and fat loss, peaks at night during your sleep; eating a big meal before bedtime provides your body the nutrients to capitalize on maximal GH activities. Also, fasting throughout the day increases GH secretion.
5. BURNS EXCESS ENERGY
With the Warrior Diet, you never count calories—instead, eat as you please and let your body control your appetite because the body lacks a mechanism to count calories.
“We actually thrive on energy depletion, not on energy loading; that’s why exercise is so beneficial for you,” explains Hofmekler. “Every time you go to the gym, you deplete your energy and that’s the environment your body thrives under.”
When you overload yourself with high-carb fuel, however, you fill your with energy molecules ADP and NADPH and shut down your stress response mechanisms. “If you don’t exercise and burn it immediately, all the adverse effects—inflammation, fat gain, etc.—start to happen.”
By under-eating, however, you will never overload on energy; instead, you’ll gradually deplete it throughout the day.
“In fitness, exercise is important, but nutritional stress is even more important,” says Hofmekler. “Combining both of them is the magic formula—if you add to that the right food, nothing can stop you.”



read more HERE

Do I have tennis elbow?

Posted on January 6, 2017 at 11:40 PM

Hi there,

My name is John and I work as a physical therapist in Auckland, New Zealand I recently created www.tennis-elbow-cure.com to help you overcome this painful condition. I was so impressed with this blog that I had to share an infographic that I had made which will help you identify if you have this condition.

I hope it helps!



Meal Prep (Vegetarian, Gluten Free) 1678 Calories

Posted on March 27, 2016 at 7:50 PM
Meal Prep! Vegetarian, Gluten Free, 1678 calories




Breakfast
1/3 cup gluten free granola loaded fruit and nut (Trader Joe's)
Trader joe's organic low fat vanilla bean yogurt 6 oz
2 eggs (cook how you like)
2 squares 85% dark chocolate
You could move the dark chocolate to later in the morning or move it to lunch or after dinner if you prefer. Totally up to you and what works with your needs.
596 cals, 55 carbs, 32 fat, 22 protein

Lunch
1/2 cup lentils
1 cup brown rice
1 persian cucumber
7 cherry tomatoes
1 tablespoon coconut oil
532 cals, 78 carbs, 17 fat, 16 prot

Snack
2 whole carrots
1 cup blueberries
1 cup chamomile or green tea or black coffee (not pictured)
135 cals, 33 carbs, 1 fat, 2 prot

Dinner
1/2 cup lentils
1 cup brown rice
1 persian cucumber
7 cherry tomatoes
415 cals, 78 carbs, 3 fat, 16 prot

daily totals: 1678 cals, 244 carbs, 52 fat, 57 prot